THE HISTORY OF YOUR WATER & SEWER LINES

CIVILIZATION RUNS ON FRESH CLEAN WATER

Cities, towns, villages & municipalities of all shapes & sizes have had at least one important thing in common since the dawn of civilization; the absolute need for clean water and sanitation. Throughout history, we’ve found ways to bring fresh water into our homes, and ways to take sewage away from our homes.
In modern times, with the advent of modern plumbing and sewage treatment methods, cities have taken on the responsibilities of placing the necessary infrastructures to handle these vital functions. Cities have laid miles and miles of water supply lines and sewer lines so that their residents could all live better. But in most cases, that happened a long, long time ago… So now the question becomes, how well are those original systems lasting, and what happens if and when they fail?
THE HISTORY OF YOUR WATER & SEWER LINES

THE HISTORY OF YOUR WATER & SEWER LINES

In 1798, Mr. Benjamin Latrobe had determined that the main water supply in his own city, Philadelphia, had also become its greatest source of disease. He found that the groundwater was being contaminated because of poorly contained wastewater. Since the early 1800s, there have been two primary sanitation strategies in the US; Centralized: wastewater is collected and routed to a central treatment location, and Decentralized: wastewater is treated at or near its source.
In 1843, the worlds first modern centralized sewer system was built in Hamburg, Germany. The design was so successful that, by the mid-1800’s, it had been adopted in The United States as well, prompted by population growth & public health concerns, among other factors. By the late 1800’s, public demand for the installation of centralizes sewage treatment gained a national voice in cities across the country.
While the quality, demand, and understanding of freshwater and sanitation concerns waxed and waned, by the mid-1900’s, with the growth of American cities and towns, the necessity for better sanitation had become clear. The federal government passed the Water Pollution Control Act of 1948, which created legislation for the planning, technical services, research, financial assistance, and enforcement necessary for a healthy water supply in every American town. In 1952, the act was extended and became permanent law in 1956.

DO YOU KNOW THAT YOU ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR LINES RUNNING UNDER YOUR OWN PROPERTY?

Now, in 2018, we have a clear idea of how time has affected and degraded the water supply lines and the sewer lines that run beneath our cities and homes. In many cases, they have not aged well.
Over time, many of these systems have suffered deterioration and structural instability. From root growth to simple movement or settling of the ground itself, cracks, gaps, and breaks occur. When this happens, it can cost the homeowner more than the cost of lost water.
One major concern for homeowners, many of whom are unaware, is the potential cost of water lines that run beneath and to their own homes. In many American cities, costs to replace or repair the connecting supply & sewer lines falls to the homeowner, even when the lines extend off property to reach the main lines. Simply being unaware of this, and then suffering a critical failure of either your water supply line or sewer line can cost a homeowner several thousands of dollars.
What resources are available to a homeowner if they suffer a water line leak or require water line repair, sewer line repair, clogged sewer line cleanout or even sewer line replacement?
There is good news. Cities across the nation are aware of the financial burden that lurks unseen at nearly every home-owners door. Proactive municipalities have established relationships with companies that provide assurance, response, and technical knowledge to help cities and homeowners prepare for the costs of aging fresh water and sewer systems.
Water supply line and sewer line repair and/or replacement can be very costly. The cost of excavation and replacement of utility lines under your property can run into the thousands. In worst case scenarios, the home owners responsibility can extend beyond their property line all the way to the main water line or sewer line. If the damaged lines run beneath sidewalks, streets or highways, even the costs of excavating through and then replacing the street or sidewalk may be the financial responsibility of the connected home owner.
Due to the risk of failure of these aged water and sewer lines and the high costs of repair or replacement, cities everywhere are now making insurance policies available to their residents to deal with these expenses. Many cities are currently working with National Water Company, a well established insurance company that carries a very strong policy specifically built to protect home owners from the coming expenses of aging utilities.
Whether your home is 5 years old or 100, NWC has a policy that will provide coverage for your home’s utilities, as well as peace of mind.
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